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ScientificAmericanhttps://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mysterious-insect-fossil-gap-explained/  A lack of diverse, winged hexapods—not low oxygen levels—could explain the gap in the fossil record

By Lucas Joel

Insects are … Read more...

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Citrus canker. Photo: Plant Health Australia.

FreshFruitPortal https://www.freshfruitportal.com/news/2018/04/19/australia-citrus-canker-detected-in-northern-territory/

Citrus canker has been detected in retail nurseries in Australia’s Northern Territory, but to date the disease has only been … Read more...
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EurekAlert https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/ws-h041318.php

How and why has life on Earth become ever more complex over time? Darwin's theory has provided us with a general framework for understanding biological evolution, but it …

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Ghana News Agency http://www.ghananewsagency.org/science/ghana-to-focus-on-bio-rational-products-for-management-of-faw-131321

By Belinda Ayamgha, GNAAccra, April 13, GNA - The Ministry of Food and Agriculture says it has shifted its focus from … Read more...
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2018-04-19T04:00:00.0000000Z

New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/17/science/beetle-evolution-parasite.html

By James Gorman When Joseph Parker was growing up in Swansea, in South Wales, he had an obsession with insects. His room was filled with tropical insects, but … Read more...
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ChannelNews Asia https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/insect-farms-gear-up-to-feed-soaring-global-protein-demand-10136078

LANGLEY, British Columbia: Layers of squirming black soldier fly larvae fill large aluminum bins stacked 10-high in …

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Butterfly pollinating during monsoon season. Hitesh Chhetri / www.shutterstock.com 

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13891Wild insect pollinators important
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    grahame jackson
    Apr 19
    The Conversation
    https://theconversation.com/honeybees-hog-the-limelight-yet-wild-insects-are-the-most-important-and-vulnerable-pollinators-93247

    Honeybees hog the limelight, yet wild insects are the most important and vulnerable pollinators
    April 11, 2018 10.49pm AEST

    Pollinating insects like bees, butterflies and flies have had a rough time of late. A broad library of evidence suggests there has been a widespread decline in their abundance and diversity since the 1950s. This matters because such insects are critical both for the reproduction of wild plants and for agricultural food production.

    The decline of these pollinators is linked with destruction of natural habitats like forests and meadows, the spread of pests such as Varroa mite and diseases like foulbrood, and the increasing use of agrochemicals by farmers. Although there have been well documented declines in managed honeybees, non-Apis (non-honeybee) pollinators such as bumblebees and solitary bees have also become endangered.

    There are more than 800 wild (non-honey) bee species in Europe alone. Seven are classified by the IUCN Redlist as critically endangered, 46 are endangered, 24 are vulnerable and 101 are near threatened. Collectively, losing such species would have a significant impact on global pollination.

    Though much of the media focus is on honeybees, they are responsible for only a third of the crop pollination in Britain and a very small proportion of wild plant pollination. A range of other insects including butterflies, bumblebees and small flies make up for this pollination deficit.
    Butterfly pollinating during monsoon season. Hitesh Chhetri / www.shutterstock.com
    Not all pollinators are created equal

    Pollinators also vary in their effectiveness due to their behaviour around flowers and their capacity to hold pollen. Bigger and hairier insects can carry more pollen, while those that groom themselves less tend to be able to transfer pollen more effectively. Bumblebees, for example, make excellent pollinators (far superior to honeybees) as they are big, hairy and do not groom themselves as often.

    Where they are in decline, honeybees suffer primarily from pests and diseases, a consequence of poor nutrition and artificially high population density. This differs from other pollinators, where the decline is mainly down to habitat destruction. It seems pesticides affect all pollinators.
    An ashy mining-bee (Andrena cineraria) settles in for a snack. Philip Donkersley, Author provided The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is the most common species of honey bee. Philip Donkersley, Author provided A mosaic of different flowers: these sorts of landscapes are paradise for bees. Philip Donkersley, Author provided

The Conversation https://theconversation.com/honeybees-hog-the-limelight-yet-wild-insects-are-the-most-important-and-vulnerable-pollinators-93247

Pollinating insects like bees, butterflies and flies have had a rough time of late. A broad library …

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Solitary cavity nesting bees like Osmia or Megachile have a very different lifestyle than the social honey bee. Solitary bees such as alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) face different—and less well-understood—challenges from pesticide exposure than their colony-dwelling honey bee cousins. Here, an alfalfa leafcutting bee visits an alfalfa flower. Pollen grains are visible behind the bee, as the bee has “tripped” the flower, causing pollen to be released outward. This facilitates pollination for alfalfa.. (Photo credit: Theresa Pitts-Singer, Ph.D.)

Entomology today https://entomologytoday.org/2018/04/12/beyond-honey-bee-pesticides-solitary-bees/ By Meredith Swett Walker

Humans and honey bees go way back. We’ve been raiding their hives for honey for at least 10,000 years, and we domesticated …

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2018-04-17T22:00:00.0000000Z

ScienceDaily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180405100141.htm

Source:
University of Helsinki
Summary:
Novel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as …
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