Sydney NSW, Australia
Identification request
2018-04-04T08:00:00.0000000Z
   2
Identification of whitefly on cassava, DR Congo

Dear pestneters,

I am sorry to pester you with some probably trivial ninja-fly taxonomy, however would it be possible for you to assist me with a quick statement on the taxonomic affiliation of the insect attached in the two pix. We see this for the first time AND in very high abundance on some of the cassava we have started to grow in the Eastern DR Congo.

Thanks a million and apologies for my entomological ignorance. There is no one else in the field who can help.

Regards,

Stephan

Dr. Stephan WinterHead, Plant Virus Department
Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures 
Messeweg 11/12
38104 Braunschweig
Germany
tel.      +49 531 2993780
email:  stephan.winter@dsmz.de
www.dsmz.de 
Director: Prof. Dr. Jörg Overmann
Local court: Braunschweig HRB 2570
Chairman of the management board: MR Dr. David Schnieders

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Cassava
DR_Congo
Whitefly

Responses

   0
2018-04-05T04:00:00.0000000Z

Class Hexapoda, Order Hemiptera, Suborder Sternorrhyncha, Infraorder Aleyrodomorpha, Family Aleyrodidae, Subfamily Aleurodicinae, genus Aleurodicus

Gillian Watson Ex-California Department of Food & Agriculture

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Aleurodicus
Class_Hexapoda
Order_Hemiptera
Suborder_Sternorrhyncha
Infraorder_Aleyrodomorpha
   0
2018-04-05T14:00:00.0000000Z

Whitefly family Aleyrodidae - possibly spiralling whitefly, Aleurodicus

Peter Maddison

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DR_Congo
Aleyrodidae
Spiraling_whitefly
Aleurodicus
   0
2018-04-10T14:00:00.0000000Z

Dear Stephan,
I would think of a mealybug for the first picture, maybe together with stuff from whitefly. I do not recognize spiralling whitefly symptoms (Aleurodicus dispersus) that usually are present: circles of eggs, laid by adult females while they walk around in a bit irregular circles. As the size is not indicated, it may also be the cassava whitefly Bemisia tabaci. ID is best done on the last sedentary larval instar (often incorrectly called pupae). Any material of last instar nymphs available? You can collect and take them to Europe when dead (by freezing or heat) and dried. Also material stored in alcohol 70% can be used for ID, but I usually try to stick to the recipe of NHM London:.Aleyrodidae: collect plant material with “pupal” cases, wrap in tissue and put in envelope with all relevant dataEurope does not like it if live material of whiteflies is imported, so if you are not sure the material is dead, ask for an import license for "scientific material" of potential quarantine organisms from your national plant protection organisation.
Hope this helps,
ErnstK.E. Neering Bowlespark 12 6701 DP Wageningen The Netherlands Phone (voice) ++31 317 418623

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Cassava
Bemisia_tabaci
Aleurodicus_dispersus
CassavaDR_Congo
Preservation
   0
2018-04-11T14:00:00.0000000Z

In India, similar symptoms are seen on many plants. The insect was identified as Rugose Spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus rugioperculatus. Better check in that angle also. In the first photo it appears that the colony has abandoned. But the presence of waxy floccus material indicates it is RSW. Please check the adult for the brown coloured bands.

Potineni Kalidas

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Cassava
India
DR_Congo
Aleurodicus_rugioperculatus