Sydney NSW, Australia
Identification request
2018-12-30T01:27:00.0000000Z
   1
Disease on mango (trunk) in northern Senegal

Pierre SILVIE pierre.silvie@cirad.fr [pestnet] 

Dear Pestnetworkers

a colleague of us found some symptoms on the trunk of his mango trees 
(see picture) in Senegal. Il could be a fungus according to a 
publication (attached file). Has somebody found the same disease 
somewhere and could confirm the diagnostic? Many thanks
-- 
Pierre SILVIE
Entomologist IRD/CIRAD
orcid.org/0000-0002-3406-6230
CIRAD-PERSYST
AÏDA Research Unit (Agroécologie et Intensification Durable des cultures Annuelles)
CARABE Team
TA B 115/02
34398 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
Phone: (33) 4 67 61 49 32
Portable/celular: (33) 6 67 98 92 90
http://ur-aida.cirad..fr/en
https://www.divecosys.org/en/
http://www.divecosys.org

Posted on user's behalf

Mango
Senegal
CIRAD

Responses

   0
2018-12-29T14:00:00.0000000Z
grahame jackson <grahamejackson@gmail.com>
Disease on mango (trunk) in northern Senegal [2 Attachments]
Dear Pierre

Lasiodiplodia is a virulent wound pathogen on all parts of mango and many other trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants in the tropics. It is unlikely to be the cause of the trunk disease. I guess you have checked for insects, and found none. Have a closer look and see if you can find pink disease - several names, Phanerochaete, Corticium and more lately Erythricium salmonicolor. Often you will find this on mango near where a branch starts. Look for a shallow pink growth or crust. Gum is produced. 

Look for the crust that is still young, on trunks producing gum; it is not likely that you will find it on trunks like that in the photo where the damage is old.

There's a fact sheet on the Pestnet website (www.pestnet.org), under Cocoa pink disease (012)

Let us know how you get on

grahame
Pink_disease
Erythricium_salminicolor
   1    0
2018-12-31T01:58:50.4651627Z

It is not clear how old the trees are but photo looks like there has been extensive damage to the cortex of the young tree some time ago  and it is now healing over. Could it have been damaged by animals eating the young bark. Alternatively could it have been damaged by sunburn soon after transplanting. In both cases protecting the young trunks with trunk sleeves might prevent a similar problem occurring in future.

2019-01-01T01:52:20.6981182Z
Pierre SILVIE